Even More Space News (Pluto Edition)

By NASA / Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By NASA / Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Sorry, sorry, sorry. I know I’ve spent the last few posts discussing space (here and here). But can you blame me? Space is so cool and I can’t help but write about it every week. So, to make up for another post about space in such a short amount of time, I’ll post a second piece later today about something totally unrelated to space (no guarantees).

So what’s the big deal in space this week? Pluto, of course. If you’re not a big NASA geek like me, you might have missed the news from this summer that a spacecraft, New Horizons, captured new HD images of the dwarf planet.

Thanks to New Horizons, scientists have been able to study the planet for the first time in human history. This is a big deal. They are learning information about Pluto never thought to exist. Which brings me to the news from this week:

New Horizons geologists combined images of Pluto’s surface to make 3-D maps that indicate two of Pluto’s most distinctive mountains could be cryovolcanoes — ice volcanoes that may have been active in the recent geological past. – Karen Northon via NASA.gov

Ice volcanoes? I don’t know about you, but those are the geological wonders I only imagined in a fantasy novel or video game. I half expect them to find evidence of an ice dragon curled up under the surface. OK, maybe not really, but wouldn’t that be wild?


Scientists are learning new things all the time, so I’ll do my best to keep you all informed. In the meantime, you can learn more about New Horizons and Pluto on your own by visiting NASA.gov.

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